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During the month of August, IF Staff worked hard to promote transparency and accountability in Iraq. As part of the Provincial Accountability and Transparency Project (PAG), IF formed 15 Integrity Monitoring Groups (IMGs) to promote a dialogue on transparency, identify areas that need improvement, and work with local officials to implement an agreed upon Agenda for Change. To facilitate the IMGs’ work, IF arranged meetings in each of the 15 province to discuss difficulties encountered, work updates, and coordinate with local provincial councils. In addition, the IMGs conducted visits to their local provincial council to discuss the draft Agenda for Change in their provinces. Each IMG also conducted a local radio talk show with provincial council officials. During these programs, IMGs described the steps that need to be taken to fight corruption in their local province.

In addition to this exciting work, IF PAG staff in Baghdad met with new U.S. Embassy anti-corruption officials on August 9th. The next day, IF staff in Baghdad participated in a U.S. Embassy strategy meeting to discuss Iraqis anti-corruption policy.

As part of our efforts to combat corruption and promote transparency, IF is pleased to announce that we have finalized the selection of the 15 provincial monitoring groups (IMGs)during the month of July. These monitoring groups are comprised of civil leaders and will work with the local provincial councils to promote an Agenda for Change. In order to select these groups, IF staff conducted visits to each of the 15 provinces to evaluate each group, discuss coordination, discuss the implementation of the province’s Agenda for Change. The Agenda for Change will be supported with an image-based anti-corruption media campaign, which will air in the coming months on local and national Iraqi Television.

To promote the Code of Conduct, IF designed, printed, and distributed 10,000 posters displaying the full text of the Code. The posters were distributed to CSOs, educational establishments, government institutions, mosques, tea shops and supermarkets, youth venues, and other community locations where they can be readily seen by the public. IF also designed and printed 18,000 pocket-sized pamphlets of the Code and the Compliance Law and distribution to government officials and professional groups, including chambers of commerce, law associations, journalists’ associations, and CSOs. The Commission on Integrity provided IF with 2,000 Code of Conduct and Compliance Law pocket-sized pamphlet. IF distributed those pamphlets to the participants during the provincial council and civic leaders workshops.

IF successfully held four workshops in May and June as part of the Provincial Accountability and Governance Project (PAG). The Training of Trainers (TOT) workshops, held in Beirut in collaboration with the Lebanese Transparency Associations (LTA), aimed to provide civic leaders and local government officials from 15 Iraqi provinces with a comprehensive toolkit of anti-corruption indicators, monitoring methodologies, and civic organizing techniques to enable the participants to break down and simplify the legal and formal aspects of accountability into achievable operational components and practices, and thus provide a detailed, practical “how to” of steps to bring about change toward greater transparency. In total, four workshops were held, which included representatives from Iraq’s provinces.

The training was delivered in the form of four back-to-back four-day workshops, as follows:

-First Workshop: (May 25 through May 28); for Baghdad, Mousel, and Kirkuk provinces

-Second Workshop: (May 29 through June 1); Babil, Wasit, Salah Al-Din, and Al-Qadisiyyah provinces

-Third workshop: (June 2 through June 5); Anbar, Diyala,Najaf, and Karbala provinces

-Fourth Workshop :( June 6 through June 9); Al-Muthanna, Thi-Qar, Maysan, and Basra provinces.

The participants of the four workshops were selected by IF from among the trainees (notable civic leaders and local government officials) of the previous 30 civic leaders (CL) and provincial councils (PC) workshops that were conducted by IF in 15 Iraqi provinces. In total120 participants were scheduled to take part in the workshops.

Day one of the training started with trainers explaining the concept of transparency, the components of a transparent system, the right to access to information, what is a well organized archiving system, and who to protect whistleblowers.

The trainers then introduced the International Indicators and principles of anti-corruption with an ample explanation for the World Bank indicators. The participants were then divided into groups and discussed the anti-corruption indicators and responsibilities of the Commission on Integrity (COI) and the other existing integrity monitoring authorities in Iraq. Trainers also explained in detail, the United Nation Convention for Anti Corruption, then received questions and feedback from the participants.

The second day of the training started by presenting the National Integrity System (NIS) of Transparency International (TI). An NIS report for Morocco, Egypt, Palestine, and Lebanon was presented, then a presentation was delivered on the Global Integrity Index (GII). Towards the end of the day, the participants were divided into six groups. Each group discussed the NIS and the international indicators. They brainstormed possible applications for Iraq and submitted their viewpoints.

On day three, the Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) was introduced to the participants. An explanation on how IMIS can assist in fighting corruption was delivered. Viewpoints from the participants were received. Towards the end of the day, the Iraqi national anti-corruption strategy was delivered by a workshops participant who is a member of the Iraqi national anti-corruption strategy group. The strategy was thoroughly discussed by the participants.

On day four of the training, the participants were divided according to their provinces to sit and structure an Agenda for Change for their provinces. Each team identified the substances and causes of anti-corruption in their province, and accordingly structured an Agenda for Change depending on the international standards learned from the training and the facts in their provinces. LTA is currently reviewing the groups’ Agendas and will attach its recommendations with each agenda and send to IF. IF will launch the formation of the Integrity Monitoring Groups (IMG) in each province by next month, July 2010, and will hand each IMG it’s relevant Agenda for Change to start monitoring anti-corruption, accordingly. Towards the end of each workshop, a questionnaire form was distributed to each participant to evaluate the overall training. Also, a certificate of participation was conferred to each workshop participant.

IF is facilitating a series of one workshop for senior officials in each province on the Code and the related Compliance Law to assist managers and provincial council members to better enforce compliance. In particular, the training will guide managers to specific steps that can be taken -such as requiring careful review and testing on the Code, mandating signature by all employees, and introducing penalties for breaking the Code- that can promote awareness and raise the level of compliance.

In 2006 the Commission on Integrity promulgated a Code of Conduct for public officials, but records at the Commission show that some federal government agencies have not required its signature by employees. Nevertheless, the Code holds tremendous potential as a document that describes the standard of ethical practice that is expected from employees in the public sector. It can be instrumental in setting a moral bar and changing attitudes of citizens and guiding norms of public employees on issues relating to corruption, the abuse of authority and the importance of individual and institutional ethics in public service.

Iraq also has one of the oldest Ethical Compliance Disciplinary Laws. It has not been evenly and equitably enforced in the past two decades, however, thus creating a culture of impunity and tolerance of corruption in government offices. A renewed emphasis on the Code of Conduct and the previously standing Law on Compliance and Disciplinary Action is needed both to serve as a deterrent and change the culture of corruption in post 2003 Iraq.

Civil Society Workshops by Location:

Baghdad
March 19 – 20, 2010

Babil
March 23 -24, 2010

Wasit
March 26 – 27, 2010

Kirkuk
March 23 – 24, 2010

Salah Al-Deen
March 29-30, 2010

Diyala
April 14 – 15, 2010

Maysan
April 23 – 24, 2010

Al Basra
April 16 – 17,2010

Dhi Qar
April 16 -17, 2010

Al Muthanna
April 23 – 24, 2010

Al-Qadisiyyah
April 9 – 10, 2010

Karbala
April 5 – 6, 2010

An Najaf
April 7 – 9, 2010

Al Anbar
April 13 – 14, 2010

Duhok (Mosul)
March 31 – April 1, 2010

In response to the need to strengthen country-wide civic awareness of the anti-corruption and accountability measures available in Iraq, the Commission on Integrity is collaborating with the Iraq Foundation to provide training to civic leaders in the 15 provinces. The workshops run for two days in each location and include CSOs, business professionals, law groups, journalists, academics, clerics, and other opinion shapers and stakeholders. Training will cover the legal and regulatory framework in Iraq, including:

(1) the roles and mandates of the Commission, the Office of the Inspector General, and the Board of Supreme Audit;

(2) the oversight responsibilities of elected bodies (CoR and provincial councils);

(3) current and draft anti-corruption laws;

(4) procurement law and regulations;

(5) the Draft Law on Access to Information

(6) the Code of Ethics promulgated by the Commission on Integrity, with associated conflict of interest provisions and disclosure requirements.

The training address the mechanisms and practices that must be put in place by the provincial governments to implement the relevant laws and regulations. The workshops emphasize the role of civil society in recognizing and limiting corruption. Participants and the Commission together draft recommendations on ways in which civic groups can support the mission of the Commission on Integrity by bolstering its human capital and local buy-in to make it more effective in combating corruption.

Civil Society Workshops by Location:

Baghdad
March 19 – 20, 2010

Babil
March 23 -24, 2010

Wasit
March 26 – 27, 2010

Kirkuk
March 23 – 24, 2010

Salah Al-Deen
March 29-30, 2010

Diyala
April 14 – 15, 2010

Maysan
April 23 – 24, 2010

Al Basra
April 16 – 17,2010

Dhi Qar
April 16 -17, 2010

Al Muthanna
April 23 – 24, 2010

Al-Qadisiyyah
April 9 – 10, 2010

Karbala
April 5 – 6, 2010

An Najaf
April 7 – 9, 2010

Al Anbar
April 13 – 14, 2010

Duhok (Mosul)
March 31 – April 1, 2010

As part of IF’s anti-corruption and transparency efforts, on Thursday December 24, 2009, IF held a Code of Conduct (COC )workshop in Baghdad in collaboration with the Iraqi Commission on Integrity (COI). Baghdad governor, the Baghdad governorate council members, senior officials, and general inspectors from Baghdad governorate council attended the workshop along with civil society organizations. Total attendance was 128. The training pertained to the Code of Conduct (COC), associated compliance laws, and their applications within the government institutions in Iraq. The training was delivered by trainers from the COI. Further workshops will follow on the Code of Conduct and other compliance laws as part of the Provincial Accountability and Governance (PAG) Project.

The participants showed a high level of engagement in the training. At the end of the training the following recommendations were given:

1) All governorate officials under the authority of Baghdad’s governorate council should abide to the COC of COI.

2) Baghdad governor in association with the COI and the Iraq Foundation, will structure a new strategy for fighting corruption within Baghdad’s governorate council.

3) Requiring the institutions of the Baghdad’s governorate council to evaluate its performance with the relevant authorities and ensure the participation of CSOs in the evaluation.

4) Hold training workshops for Baghdad’s governorate council officials on the COC under the supervision of COI and in cooperation with the Office of CSO’s office of COI, and Al-Mustansiria Universities.

5) Plan a strategy by Baghdad governorate council to design and implement a strategy to ensure and promote CSOs in fighting corruption.

6) Require all government departments to perform an exam for their new hire and promoted employees to ensure their awareness of COI’s COC.

7) IF will follow up on the implementation of the above recommendations.

IF will follow up with another training in Baghdad to cover the required training components in the project’s proposal.

As part of IF’s newly launched Provincial Accountability and Governance (PAG) project, IF delivered substantial technological equipment and computers to the Iraqi Commission of Integrity (COI). In total, the equipment will value at over $180,000 US Dollars. IF aims to dramatically enhance the COIs technical capacity to implement its work throughout Iraq. IF provided up-to-date computers, laser printers, projectors, backup systems, scanners, and a host of software suites designed to enhance productivity for the Commission.

List of delivered goods

Karbala Province, March 2011

The Iraq Foundation (IF) is currently airing PAG anti-corruption TV spots on Al-Iraqi’a TV channel to demonstrate the impact of corruption on job opportunities, health services, education, economy, and the wellbeing of the Iraqi people. The TV spots also clarify how corruption undermines democracy, civil rights, and the political rights of the people of Iraq.

In order to evaluate the impact of PAG anti-corruption TV spots on the people in the provinces, we would like you to answer this survey form for your province.

Name of NGO: The Iraqi Association for Human Rights Watch

Province: Karbala

Date: March 2011

The survey included 300 people and covered the following areas in the province of Karabla:

Gender:

Male: 210

Female: 90

Age between 25-50

Level of Education:
-Illiterate (none)
-Elementary School (5 persons)
-Secondary School (20 persons)
-High School (130 Persons)
-Associates Degree (90)
-Bachelors (40)
-Masters (15)
-Doctorate (none)

Regions Covered by the Survey:
-Metropolitan Area (140 persons)
-Ein Al-Tumir Districts (30 Persons)
-Al-Hindiya District (45 persons)
-Al-Hur District (30 Persons)
-Al-Hussania District (20 persons)
-Jadwal- Al-Karbi District (15 Persons)
-A-Kirat District (20 persons)

Survey Questions :

Part (A)

Do you watch IF PAG Anti-Corruption TV spots on TV?

Yes  275

No    15

Occasionally  10

How many times do you watch IF PAG TV spots each month?

 (1-10)  300

(10-20)

 (20-30)

Do you think that IF PAG TV spots increased people understanding to fight corruption?

Yes  300 

No

Spots didn’t have any effect

What category of people do you think IF PAG TV spots impacted?

General Public 75

Government officials

Both225

Spots did not have any effect

Part (B)

What government Institutions/facilities are the most corrupted?

Educational Institution 125

Health Facilities 75

Infrastructure Institutions 25

Other 75

(Facilities that have direct interaction with the people)

Do you think that airing IF PAG TV spots is necessary to reduce corruption?   

Yes 300

No

Somewhat

Do you think that the corruption rate dropped because of IF PAG TV spots?

Yes 300

No

Somewhat

Notes and Comments:   
The participants requested continuity of PAG TV spots broadcasting. They also requested to expand the airing to other TV channels besides Al-Iraqi’a. The results of the above survey were analyzed, studied, and then converted to a graphics design PowerPoint to use during the trainings of the IMG.

PAG-Survey-Results

Below are links to the 15 Agendas for Change, which were created in partnership with local Provincial Council officials and IF’s Integrity Monitoring Groups in each of the 15 provinces. The documents are in MS Excel and translated into English.

Anbar, English

Babil, English

Baghdad, English

Basra, English

Diwania, English

Diyala, English

Karbala, English

Maysan, English

Mousel, English

Najaf, English

Salah Al-Din, English

Samawa, English

Tameem – Kirkuk, English

Thi Qar, English

Wasit, English