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IF is facilitating a series of one workshop for senior officials in each province on the Code and the related Compliance Law to assist managers and provincial council members to better enforce compliance. In particular, the training will guide managers to specific steps that can be taken -such as requiring careful review and testing on the Code, mandating signature by all employees, and introducing penalties for breaking the Code- that can promote awareness and raise the level of compliance.

In 2006 the Commission on Integrity promulgated a Code of Conduct for public officials, but records at the Commission show that some federal government agencies have not required its signature by employees. Nevertheless, the Code holds tremendous potential as a document that describes the standard of ethical practice that is expected from employees in the public sector. It can be instrumental in setting a moral bar and changing attitudes of citizens and guiding norms of public employees on issues relating to corruption, the abuse of authority and the importance of individual and institutional ethics in public service.

Iraq also has one of the oldest Ethical Compliance Disciplinary Laws. It has not been evenly and equitably enforced in the past two decades, however, thus creating a culture of impunity and tolerance of corruption in government offices. A renewed emphasis on the Code of Conduct and the previously standing Law on Compliance and Disciplinary Action is needed both to serve as a deterrent and change the culture of corruption in post 2003 Iraq.

Civil Society Workshops by Location:

Baghdad
March 19 – 20, 2010

Babil
March 23 -24, 2010

Wasit
March 26 – 27, 2010

Kirkuk
March 23 – 24, 2010

Salah Al-Deen
March 29-30, 2010

Diyala
April 14 – 15, 2010

Maysan
April 23 – 24, 2010

Al Basra
April 16 – 17,2010

Dhi Qar
April 16 -17, 2010

Al Muthanna
April 23 – 24, 2010

Al-Qadisiyyah
April 9 – 10, 2010

Karbala
April 5 – 6, 2010

An Najaf
April 7 – 9, 2010

Al Anbar
April 13 – 14, 2010

Duhok (Mosul)
March 31 – April 1, 2010

In response to the need to strengthen country-wide civic awareness of the anti-corruption and accountability measures available in Iraq, the Commission on Integrity is collaborating with the Iraq Foundation to provide training to civic leaders in the 15 provinces. The workshops run for two days in each location and include CSOs, business professionals, law groups, journalists, academics, clerics, and other opinion shapers and stakeholders. Training will cover the legal and regulatory framework in Iraq, including:

(1) the roles and mandates of the Commission, the Office of the Inspector General, and the Board of Supreme Audit;

(2) the oversight responsibilities of elected bodies (CoR and provincial councils);

(3) current and draft anti-corruption laws;

(4) procurement law and regulations;

(5) the Draft Law on Access to Information

(6) the Code of Ethics promulgated by the Commission on Integrity, with associated conflict of interest provisions and disclosure requirements.

The training address the mechanisms and practices that must be put in place by the provincial governments to implement the relevant laws and regulations. The workshops emphasize the role of civil society in recognizing and limiting corruption. Participants and the Commission together draft recommendations on ways in which civic groups can support the mission of the Commission on Integrity by bolstering its human capital and local buy-in to make it more effective in combating corruption.

Civil Society Workshops by Location:

Baghdad
March 19 – 20, 2010

Babil
March 23 -24, 2010

Wasit
March 26 – 27, 2010

Kirkuk
March 23 – 24, 2010

Salah Al-Deen
March 29-30, 2010

Diyala
April 14 – 15, 2010

Maysan
April 23 – 24, 2010

Al Basra
April 16 – 17,2010

Dhi Qar
April 16 -17, 2010

Al Muthanna
April 23 – 24, 2010

Al-Qadisiyyah
April 9 – 10, 2010

Karbala
April 5 – 6, 2010

An Najaf
April 7 – 9, 2010

Al Anbar
April 13 – 14, 2010

Duhok (Mosul)
March 31 – April 1, 2010

As part of IF’s anti-corruption and transparency efforts, on Thursday December 24, 2009, IF held a Code of Conduct (COC )workshop in Baghdad in collaboration with the Iraqi Commission on Integrity (COI). Baghdad governor, the Baghdad governorate council members, senior officials, and general inspectors from Baghdad governorate council attended the workshop along with civil society organizations. Total attendance was 128. The training pertained to the Code of Conduct (COC), associated compliance laws, and their applications within the government institutions in Iraq. The training was delivered by trainers from the COI. Further workshops will follow on the Code of Conduct and other compliance laws as part of the Provincial Accountability and Governance (PAG) Project.

The participants showed a high level of engagement in the training. At the end of the training the following recommendations were given:

1) All governorate officials under the authority of Baghdad’s governorate council should abide to the COC of COI.

2) Baghdad governor in association with the COI and the Iraq Foundation, will structure a new strategy for fighting corruption within Baghdad’s governorate council.

3) Requiring the institutions of the Baghdad’s governorate council to evaluate its performance with the relevant authorities and ensure the participation of CSOs in the evaluation.

4) Hold training workshops for Baghdad’s governorate council officials on the COC under the supervision of COI and in cooperation with the Office of CSO’s office of COI, and Al-Mustansiria Universities.

5) Plan a strategy by Baghdad governorate council to design and implement a strategy to ensure and promote CSOs in fighting corruption.

6) Require all government departments to perform an exam for their new hire and promoted employees to ensure their awareness of COI’s COC.

7) IF will follow up on the implementation of the above recommendations.

IF will follow up with another training in Baghdad to cover the required training components in the project’s proposal.

As part of IF’s newly launched Provincial Accountability and Governance (PAG) project, IF delivered substantial technological equipment and computers to the Iraqi Commission of Integrity (COI). In total, the equipment will value at over $180,000 US Dollars. IF aims to dramatically enhance the COIs technical capacity to implement its work throughout Iraq. IF provided up-to-date computers, laser printers, projectors, backup systems, scanners, and a host of software suites designed to enhance productivity for the Commission.

List of delivered goods

On October 9, 2012, IF hosted a screening of the film, “Interfaith Dialogue in Mesopotamia,” at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC. The screening was held in cooperation with the Global Politics and Religion Initiative and the Middle East Studies Program of SAIS.

Dr. Leila Austin, Co-Director, Global Politics and Religion Initiative, SAIS provided opening comments and welcomed attendees to SAIS. Rend Al-Rahim, Executive Director of the Iraq Foundation provided an introduction of the Iraq Foundation (IF), the film and welcomed Michael Posner, Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor. Mr. Posner discussed the importance of freedom of religion and religious diversity in Iraq and in the Middle East region. His Excellency,Ambassador Samir Sumaidaie commented on the history of religious coexistence in Iraq.

The screening aimed to capture Iraq’s thriving belief cultures and foster understanding among a U.S.-based audience of Iraq’s long history as a country where religious diversity has flourished. To achieve this goal, the event showcased a film, produced in cooperation with AlSumaria, based on documentaries produced by the participants of the Interfaith Cooperation Project (ICP), which aims to deepen public knowledge and promote dialogue about Iraq’s diverse religious heritage and to enhance religious freedom, interfaith cooperation, trust and mutual respect among faith communities. As part of this project, IF sponsored a nationwide documentary film competition and selected teams of young Iraqi men and women from different religious backgrounds and provinces who came together to produce 15 documentaries on significant historic religious sites across Iraq. The 5 best documentaries were edited and broadcast on national television. Documentaries cover historic shrines of all religions and a special emphasis on religious sites that are ‘shared’ by many different faiths and religious sites in close proximity, demonstrating how different faiths can live and worship side by side. Project participants held 63 discussion-based screenings of the documentaries in 15 provinces, reaching an audience of over 8,000 people. Documentaries were broadcasted on five national Iraqi TV stations. It is estimated that one in four Iraqis has seen at least one of the documentaries.

Selected photos of event:

Dr. Leila Austin, Co-Director of SAIS’ Global Politics and Religion Initiative, welcomed audience to SAIS.

Rend Al-Rahim, Executive Director of the Iraq Foundation, provided introductory comments.

Assistant Secretary of State, Michael Posner, discussed religious diversity in Iraq and the region.

His Excellency, Ambassador Samir Sumaidaie, Former Ambassador of Iraq to the United States discussed the film’s themes.

The screening aimed to capture Iraq’s thriving belief cultures and foster understanding of Iraq’s long history as a country where religious diversity has flourished.

From June 2011-August 2012, teams of young Iraqi men and women from different religious backgrounds and provinces came together to produce 15 documentaries on significant historic religious sites across Iraq. The documentaries, which were produced with the assistance and support of AlSumaria TV, seek to highlight the rich heritage of religious diversity that lives on in modern Iraq and build understanding among Iraq’s religious and ethnic communities. Documentaries cover historic shrines of all religions and a special emphasis on religious sites that are ‘shared’ by many different faiths and religious sites in close proximity, demonstrating how different faiths can live and worship side by side.

Project participants held 63 screenings of the documentaries in 15 provinces, reaching an audience of over 8,000 people. Documentaries were broadcasted on five national Iraqi TV stations including, Alsumaria, Al-Iraqiya, Al-Fayhaa, Biladi, and Al-Baghdadiya. It is estimated that one in four Iraqis has seen at least one of the documentaries. In October of 2012, IF will hold a screening of a film, produced in cooperation with AlSumaria, which is based on 15 documentaries produced by the project participants in Washington, DC. The screening will aim to capture Iraq’s thriving belief cultures and foster understanding among a U.S.-based audience of Iraq’s long history as a country where religious diversity has flourished. To read more about the event, view the invitation here.

According to the independent evaluation report, “the documentaries have undoubtedly contributed to the promotion of religious freedom and religious tolerance [in Iraq… through] adding information and knowledge regarding religious freedom and religious tolerance… and affecting attitudes and changing practices.”

Other key findings of the independent evaluation report are described below:

  •  Audiences that attended documentary screenings responded positively and indicated their willingness to promote religious tolerance and acceptance of religious diversity. This response indicates that the documentaries were not only necessary for Iraqi society but also that the audiences directly translated the messages of the documentaries into a willingness to promote the objectives of the project.
  •  Various sources have confirmed that there is great interest in interfaith cooperation in Iraq. The questionnaires filled out by audience members that attended the screenings demonstrated the interest of community members in improving interfaith cooperation in Iraq and in particular, in gaining a better understanding of Iraq’s religious diversity.
  •  The documentaries addressed the great religious heritage and historical civilization of Iraq and the coexistence of different religions within one society
  •  The documentaries also successfully highlighted examples of religious tolerance between various constituencies of Iraqi society throughout the past centuries. They stressed the uniqueness of each religion and the right of adherents to practice their rituals and ceremonies as well as the obligation of others to respect their traditions.
  •  Showing mosques, churches, shrines and temples in one documentary contributed greatly to encouraging a better dialogue between religions.
  •  Many Iraqis think that there are only two races, Arabs and Kurds, and only two religions, Islam and Christianity. In this context, the documentaries were extremely important in showcasing the diversity of races and religions existing in Iraq

Selected quotes from ICP youth participants also included in the independent evaluation report can be found below:

  •  “Thanks to ICP, I have dedicated many of my activities to restoring the ethnic and social cracks that have fractured Iraqi society. We must think of other activities that could lend themselves to similar objectives.” – Ahmad Shams, Maysan
  •  “The experience of creating the documentaries demonstrated to my team the positive impact of peaceful coexistence. We used to believe in coexistence but after this experience, we now know that peaceful coexistence is the only way forward for our country. What affected me the most was meeting with Muslim and Christian families, who expressed their belief in peaceful coexistence and the acceptance of others.” –Mohammed Hammoud Sultan, Salah el Din
  •  “ICP embraces a humanitarian and noble mission: to build an Iraqi society based on partnership and religious diversity. The ICP working groups worked actively to achieve this goal. Our documentary translates actual, existing models of peaceful coexistence in the Dhi Qar governorate.” –Mohammed Mohsen Al-Ibrahimi, Dhi Qar
  •  “I was lucky to establish many friendships with Iraqis from other religions. I also garnered valuable knowledge about different religions. Ultimately, we worked to achieve one goal: the promotion of the culture of diversity within our society. I hope that there will be many projects that aim to encourage acceptance of others inside the new Iraq” –Mustafa Akil Al-Khalidi, Al Diwaniya

In July 2012, IF implemented 7 documentary screenings of ICP-teams.  After each screening of these documentaries, an overview about the Iraq Foundation and its projects was presented. Descriptions of each screening can be found below.

Baghdad Team-3 presented 4 of these screenings to showcase their documentary, “Atter Al-Sama’a (Fragrance of the Sky)”. A total of 310 audiences attended the 4 screenings, and 201 of them answered the questionnaires.  Audience members included: university professors, students, engineers, journalists, artists, and civil society activists.  These screenings took place in Baghdad Province at the following locations: Authors Union’s Hall, the Hall of Assyrian National Movement, Al-Bayt Al Thakafi (The Culture House), and at the Hall of the Socialist Party.  These screenings were implemented on July 13, 18, and 28.

On July 7, Kirkuk Team implemented the 4th screening of their documentary, “Hatharatun Tarwyha Judran Samiytah (A civilization narrated by silent walls)”.  About 100 audience members attended, including college students, film-directors, theater experts, members from the Journalists Union, members of the Cultural House, actors, media persons, and community members. The screening was held at Nawrouz Hall in Kirkuk Province. 39 audience members answered the screening questionnaire.  A discussion on the film followed the screening.

On July 18, Baghdad Team-1 implemented a 5th screening of “Hamamaton Hatat Huna (A pigeon landed here)”. 150 audiences attended the screening, including: Mr. Liwa’a Samisem (The Tourism Minister), Mr. Kais Hussein Rasheed (Head of the Archeological Committee), employees, journalists, Contracts-Supervisor of IRD, authors, students, and civil society activists.
All audience members expressed their admiration for the documentary.  They expressed their appreciation towards the Iraq Foundation and the documentaries, which aim to reject sectarianism and spread peaceful coexistence among religions in Iraq. In an expression of gratitude, Mr. Rasheed (the Head of the Archeological Committeepresented a word of praise and thanks to the Iraq Foundation and to Ms. Rend Al-Rahim (The Executive Director of the Iraq Foundation).  As an expression of his gratitude, Mr. Rasheed presented a gift to Ms. Rend Al-Rahim, which is a plaque showing the famous Malwiya Minaret of Samara in addition to four books issued by The Archeological and Heritage Committee.  The Tourism Minister also presented a gift to the coordinator of Baghdad Team 1.

On July, 18, the Salah Al-Deen Team implemented a 4th screening of their documentary, “Afya’a Wtan (In the Country’s Shadow)”.  This screening was held in The Sports and Youth Directory in Salah Al-Deen Province, and was attended by more than 130 audience members, which included members from Salah Al-Deen Province, media experts, writers, and students.  130 audience members answered the screening questionnaire. Q&A Session followed the screening.  The screening was also well-covered by the media, specifically Al-Rasheed Satellite Channel and Salah Al-Deen Satellite Channel.

Selected Photos:

Baghdad Team-3 pictures of screenings:

Kirkuk Team-screenings:

Baghdad 1 Team-screenings:

Salah Al-Deen Team-screenings:

Selected Photos:


April 11, 2012: Salah Al-Deen team - 3rd screening of Afya’a Wtan (In the Country’s Shadow) documentary in the Hall of Tikrit University.


May 21, 2012: Dahouk team – 4th screening of Shajarat Al-Hayat (The Tree of Life) documentary in the Hall of Law School/ Dahouk University.


May 21, 2012: Ninava team-4th screening of Naynawa Mawtin Al-Adyan (Ninava Home of Religions) documentary in the Hall of the Turkuman Brotherhood Hall/ Rasheediya area in Mosul.

June 1, 2012:  Basra team-4th screening of Al-Iraq Ard Al-Had’arat Wa Mnuba’a Al-Dyan Al-Samawya (Iraq the land of civilizations and the source of religions in the hall of the Labor Union-Basra branch.


June 10, 2012: Baghdad team no. 1-4th screening of Hamamaton Hatat Huna (A pigeon landed here) in the hall of the Writer’s Union in Baghdad.


June, 19, 2012:  Babil team-4th screening of Multka Al-Adyan (Where all Religions Meet) in the hall of the Cultural House in Babil. 

June, 21, 2012: Diwaniya team-4th screening of Ma’an (Together) in the hall of Diwaniya Provincial Council.


June 21, 2012: Ninava team-5th screening of Naynawa Mawtin Al-Adyan (Ninava Home of Religions) documentary in Sarjoun Hall-Ninava International Hotel in Mosul.


June, 23, 2012: Diwaniya team-4th screening of Ma’an (Together) in the Happiness Entertainment City Park in Diwaniya.


June 23, 2012: Maysan team-4th screening of Multka Anhar Alsma’a (Where the Sky Rivers Meet) in the hall of Jawhart Maysan Coffee Shop in Maysan.

 

This month, IF worked to assist qualified ICP participants to participate in international film festivals as film producers. The ICP Mosul team was accepted as participants at the Malmo Film Festival, to be held in June. This month, ICP teams continued using the ICP Facebook Page to exchange comments and suggestions.

IF has also worked to screen winning documentary films at a number of art institutes and universities around Iraq. Descriptions of the screenings can be found below:

On April 11, IF screened “In the Country’s Shadow” produced by Al-Salahidin Team, at The University of Tikrit. The audience totaled 80 people, including the Dean of the College of the Arts, scientific associates, administrative assistants, faculty, students, civil society organizations, university professors, media professionals, and clergymen. A discussion took place about the concept of peaceful co-existence between different religious sects, and about the showcasing of different Christian and Muslim monuments in the film. Further discussion occurred about the importance of ethnic and religious diversity, and the film’s technical aspects (camera angles, soundtrack, etc). A questionnaire was distributed to audience members following the screening and discussions.

On April 29, IF screened one of the five winning documentaries,Hamamaton Hatat Huna (A pigeon landed here) by Baghdad Team 1 at the Institute of Fine Arts for boys in Baghdad. A total of 50 individuals attended the screening, including teachers and students.

Following the screening, questionnaires were distributed to the audience to gauge their responses to the documentary. Many viewers indicated a positive opinion of the mission of the documentaries as supportive of and contributing to “spreading religious and cultural awareness in Iraq. Other viewers thanked the Iraq Foundation for creating these documentaries: “We cherish the effort of the ICP teams, sponsored by Iraq Foundation and believe that these documentaries are beneficial and serve to showcase different perspectives, highlight the diversity inherent in Iraq and spread the principle of tolerance.”

On April 10, the Salah Al-Deen team held the 3rd screening of their documentary in their local community.

Selected Photos:

“In the Country’s Shadow”screening at the University of Tikrit

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“In the Country’s Shadow”screening at the University of Tikrit

2

“A pigeon landed here” screening at the Institute of Fine Arts in Baghdad

IF staff member provides a briefing on the ICP project at the “A pigeon landed here” screening at the Institute of Fine Arts in Baghdad

IF staff member distributes survey at the “A pigeon landed here” screening at the Institute of Fine Arts in Baghdad

Scene from “A pigeon landed here” screening at the Institute of Fine Arts in Baghdad 

ICP-Facebook page users exchange comments and IF staff post updates and information on upcoming film festivals

This month, IF successfully broadcasted the five winning documentaries in collaboration with Al-Sumaria, an Iraqi satellite TV station. These documentaries were created as part of IF’s Interfaith Cooperation Project (ICP).  Winning films included:The Tigris River’s Agate (Akik Dijla) by Baghdad Team 2, Where Religions Meet (Multka Al-Adyan) by the Babil Team, A civilization Narrated by Silent Walls (Hadara Tarweeha Judran Samita) by the Kirkuk Team, A pigeonlanded here (Hammonton Hatat Huna) by Baghdad Team 1, and Let’s Live Together (Lan’aeesh Ma’an) by the Diyala Team. AlSumaria edited and broadcast these documentaries as a pro-bono contribution to IF’s work!

Also this month, IF created a Facebook page to showcase ICP videos. IF asked all 15 teams to invite civic organizations, family and friends to visit the page, view the documentary films and comment on them.

IF also assisted youth in holding screenings for community members in Baghdad, Thi Qar and Al-Muthanna provinces in the month of March. A Q&A session followed each screening, during which ICP teams responded to questions and comments offered by community members about the screened documentaries, giving them the unique experience of sharing their work with community members.

For more information, please visit the ICP facebook group and the ICP Documentary Film page!

Selected Photos:

In Thi Qar, the filmmaking team held the third screening for their documentary, “The Moment of Unity,” on March 1, 2012.